Underestimated Peppermint!

DoTerra Essential Oil

Peppermint Essential Oil
Mentha piperita

Peppermint is popular in countless forms, from toothpaste to chewing gum. As an essential oil, it is useful to ease breathing and as a digestive aid

Peppermint is one of the oldest — and most highly regarded — herbs, and has been an integral part of herbal medicine for thousands of years.  It has a very wide range of uses, from soothing digestion to improving concentration and mental accuracy.

-

Key properties of peppermint oil

Some of the therapeutic properties ofpeppermint include: analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, antiseptic, anti-spasmodic, astringent, expectorant and stimulant.

-

Common uses for peppermint oil

Peppermint oil can be used for its calming effect to relieve stress and tension.  It is also effective for relieving the headaches associated with stress or digestive upset, as well as for migraines.  Just apply a few drops to the back of the neck for stress, or to the temples to relieve a headache. (careful not to get in eyes)

During the cold and flu season, peppermint can really prove itself to you.  It works well in reducing fever (just apply a few drops to the bottom of the feet).  It is also great at opening and clearing sinus and respiratory congestion.  It relieves headaches, diarrhea and nausea, and can bring a wide range of comforts to the misery of colds and flu.  (I’d hate to be sick without it.)

 The FDA has certified peppermint as GRAS, so it may also be ingested.  I’ll put a drop or two on the tongue and let it dissolve there before swallowing.

Peppermint is a natural choice to add refreshment to any beverage.  I also add it to purified water to sooth my digestion and to refresh and invigorate me.  It also freshens the breath and reduces the buildup of the bacteria that cause dental plaque and gum problems.

 During the summer months, it offers the added benefits of being very cooling, making hot weather much more bearable.

The fragrance of peppermint oil is uplifting and invigorating.  Applied topically, this oil is very soothing to tired, sore muscles.  It has analgesic properties, and can be helpful for menstrual problems or skin disorders.

=========================

Peppermint oil was used by the ancient Egyptians and Romans, as well as many other groups throughout history.  Today, it is very widely used in foods, candies, gums, dental products, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics.  In fact, it may well be one of the most readily recognizable scents and flavors.

However, because of essential oils, like peppermint, gaining mainstream acceptance, it is more important than ever before to avoid essential oils that are impure or of inferior quality.  In today’s economy, anything that is widely accepted tends to get mass produced; but, with high volume production processes, there is generally a sacrifice of quality and purity for the sake of the bottom line.

With essential oils, as with most things, you get what you pay for.

———————————

Modern research into peppermint oil

Recently, peppermint has been the focus of several studies that target its known benefits for improved digestion and anti-inflammatory activity in the intestinal tract.  Dr. P. Gardiner, M.D. has done studies on peppermint for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), digestive disorders, as a decongestant and for headaches.

Jean Valnet, M.D., studied peppermint’s effect on the liver and respiratory systems.

Other scientists have researched peppermint’s ability, when inhaled, to restore impaired taste and smell.

Dr. William N. Dember, of the University of Cincinnati, studied peppermint’s ability to improve concentration and mental accuracy.  It was found that, when peppermint was diffused in a room, the subjects were much more mentally alert, and mental accuracy was improved by about 25%.

Alan Hirsch, M.D., studied peppermint’s ability to directly affect the brain’s satiety center, which triggers a sense of fullness after meals.  As you can imagine, this could make peppermint oil a very helpful aide for weight loss

-==========-

Other uses for peppermint oil

Rub 4-6 drops in the palm and rub over stomach and around the navel to relieve indigestion, flatulence and diarrhea.

-

Add a drop of peppermint oil to herbal tea, to aid in digestion and relieve heartburn.

-

Apply peppermint oil immediately to an injured area (bruised shin, hit on the foot or hand) to relieve pain.  If there is a cut, apply thepeppermint oil around (not on) the open wound.

-

Inhale peppermint oil before and during a workout, to boost your mood and reduce fatigue.

-

To stop hiccups, apply a drop of peppermint oil on each side of the fifth cervical vertebra (up three notches from the large vertebra at the base of the neck).

-

Place two drops of peppermint oil on the tongue and rub another drop under the nose to improve alertness and concentration.  (Note: be careful not to swallow right away; allow the oil to completely dissolve on the tongue before swallowing.)

-

To deter rats, mice, ants or cockroaches, place two drops of peppermint oil on a cotton ball, and place along the path or point of entry for these pests.

-

Inhale the fragrance of peppermint oil to curb the appetite and lessen the impulse to overeat.

——————————-

CLICK HERE TO GET YOUR PEPPERMINT TODAY!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 627 other followers